McLaren Vale and Myponga host Light the Night events to raise money for the Leukaemia Foundation

TWO Light the Night events in McLaren Vale and Myponga will be held in October to raise much needed funds for the Leukaemia Foundation and people living with blood cancers.

FUNDRAISING: Blood cancer survivor Ros Sutherland is encouraging people across the region to be a part of Light the Night in either McLaren Vale or Myponga.

FUNDRAISING: Blood cancer survivor Ros Sutherland is encouraging people across the region to be a part of Light the Night in either McLaren Vale or Myponga.

After participating in the Light the Night event at McLaren Vale last year, Myponga’s Ros Sutherland brought together a group of passionate local people to put together an event in Myponga as well.

Eleven years ago, Mrs Sutherland was diagnosed with non-hodgkin’s lymphoma and went through what was a scary and painful chemotherapy process.

“It was a bit scary when you first get it,” she said.

“But I’m going good now and I just want to help out and raise some money for a foundation that did so much for me.”

Now, she has been in good health and is keen to make a difference by raising money for the foundation that gave her so much support – and she wants the community to get behind her.

Mrs Sutherland has been involved heavily in the Biggest Morning Tea and has now turned her attention to Light the Night, which will be held at the McLaren Vale Oval on October 7 and the Myponga Oval on October 14. 

Light the Night is a fundraising walk done at night where those walking raise money for the Leukaemia Foundation and display one of three different coloured lanterns on the night.

The white lantern, which is the colour Mrs Sutherland holds, is used to represent someone’s personal blood cancer journey; the yellow lantern is used to remember a loved one that lost their battle to blood cancer; and the blue lantern represents support for others. 

Mrs Sutherland said Light the Night gave everyone an opportunity to show their support for people living with blood cancer but especially gave people directly affected by it the opportunity to remember the experience and work towards the future.

“It wasn’t just hard for me (when I went through cancer), it’s hard for your whole family,” she said.

Mrs Sutherland said “you never know what’s around the corner” and encouraged everyone to get involved.

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