Pink Ribbon Day 2016 in Victor Harbor, Goolwa, Port Elliot, Myponga

PRETTY IN PINK: 4 Ingredients author Kim McCosker and musician Kate Ceberano are encouraging Australians to get together to support breast cancer research this October.

PRETTY IN PINK: 4 Ingredients author Kim McCosker and musician Kate Ceberano are encouraging Australians to get together to support breast cancer research this October.

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October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month - a time to focus on breast cancer and its impact on members of the community who have been affected by the disease.

Breast cancer remains the most common cancer among Australian women (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) and while survival rates are improving  in Australia with 89 out of every 100 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer now surviving five or more years beyond diagnosis, the aim is to prevent any deaths from occurring in the future.

This advertising feature has been supported by the following sponsors. Click on the links for more information. 

Research is the only way to prevent deaths, and improve how breast cancer is diagnosed, managed and treated and the National Breast Care Foundation is asking for help to continue to fund world-class research and move closer to achieving its goal of zero deaths from breast cancer by 2030.

A popular way to do this is by hosting a Pink Ribbon fundraiser on Pink Ribbon Day, Monday, October 24, or any suitable day. Pink Ribbon breakfasts are a fun and easy way to get together with friends, family or colleagues to raise funds – simply pick a date and then go to pinkribbonbreakfast.org.au to register.

​Money raised will help the National Breast Care Foundation support researchers like Dr Dinny Graham from the University of Sydney, whose innovative research has the potential to make a significant difference to those affected by breast cancer, particularly if they are diagnosed with an aggressive form of the disease called ‘triple negative breast cancer’.

“Triple negative breast cancer is particularly devastating as it often afflicts younger women and there is a lack of long-term effective treatments,” Dr Graham said.

“My research aims to investigate novel targeted treatments that can be fast-tracked to clinical care for this destructive disease.”

Each Pink Ribbon Breakfast will help NBCF reach a collective goal of $2 million which could fund a lab of five researchers for three years so that they can better understand triple negative breast cancers. 

A portion of funds raised from the advertisements on this page go to Pink Ribbon Day. The Times thanks the businesses for supporting this cause. 

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