Indigenous flavour to local football game

CULTURE: Tyson Davis-Neale in the Encounter Bay Indigenous jumper, Ryan Bridges, Cameron Hallett and Abby Bricknell who designed Goolwa/Port Elliot's jumper.
CULTURE: Tyson Davis-Neale in the Encounter Bay Indigenous jumper, Ryan Bridges, Cameron Hallett and Abby Bricknell who designed Goolwa/Port Elliot's jumper.
Goolwa./Port Elliot Football Club Indigenous guernsey.

Goolwa./Port Elliot Football Club Indigenous guernsey.

On Saturday there is a football match with a difference. It is a game that tells a story about the country’s Indigenous culture and two clubs, Encounter Bay and Goolwa/Port Elliot have embraced the concept.

Cameron Hallett with Tyson Davis-Neale.

Cameron Hallett with Tyson Davis-Neale.

Both clubs will wear jumpers designed by people with Indigenous heritage and presidents Ryan Bridges (Goolwa/Port Elliot) and Cameron Hallett (Encounter Bay) said it will become an annual event between the two clubs.

Abby Bricknell designed GPE’s jumper and Rohan Carmody, who is the brother of Bay player Rigby Barnes, designed the Bay jumper.

Ryan Bridges with Abby Bricknell.

Ryan Bridges with Abby Bricknell.

“My Dad and uncles played lots of footy at Goolwa and we have a strong Indigenous history. I am proud of the design, actually stoked with it,” Abby said.

The GPE Club’s emblem is the magpie (muldari), fierce and territorial. Maggie footprints (turnar) run up the stripes in between the water (tapatauwi) tracks, representing the water that surrounds Ngarrindjeri country (ruwi). On the chest is a map depicting the stretch of land and water of Goolwa (Kutangk), with a bird’s eye view of Goolwa’s renowned Murray River – where the river (kurri) meets the sea (yarluwar).

The 18 dots running down the middle stripe acknowledges the 18 clans (laklinyeri) of the Ngarrindjeri Nation, paying respect to the wider Ngarrindjeri community. It recognises that this is their country, my country, and the home of the magpies. The black dots represent the journey of the clans. The white dots border the ocean. On the back are the Aboriginal flag and Ngarrindjeri flag.

Aboriginal Flag: Yellow: sun, giver of life, protector, Red: earth, the red ochre used in ceremonies and the spiritual relation to the land, Black: the Aboriginal people.

Ngarrindjeri Flag: Blue: the water that surrounds Ngarrindjeri country, Dots: the 18 clans of the Ngarrindjeri Nation, Spears: traditional fishing spears of the Ngarrindjeri, Red boomerang: Sacred Boomerang, when thrown, encircles the clans informing their leaders to attend a Tendi (meeting interpreting Ngarrindjeri Law. Red ochre represents the earth, Yellow: sun, giver of life, protector.

The Encounter Bay design was by Rohan Carmody, who is a Central/Eastern Arrernte man from Mparntwe (Alice Springs) in the Northern Territory.

“The design on the front represents the three language groups of the current Indigenous players, Ngarrindjeri from South Australia, Kaytetye from Central Australia and Kuku-yalanji from North Queensland. The design on the back represents the club, the fans and the community coming together,” he said. 

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