Rotary installs Defibrillator, at Goolwa Oval

HEART STARTER: Ron Hann, Peter Ferraro, Alan Williams and Matt Meaney at the Goolwa Shopping Centre where a defib is panning to be installed.

HEART STARTER: Ron Hann, Peter Ferraro, Alan Williams and Matt Meaney at the Goolwa Shopping Centre where a defib is panning to be installed.

The Rotary Club of Goolwa, in conjunction with the Rotary Foundation, have installed a Heart Start Defibrillator, commonly known as a Defib, in the Goolwa/Port Elliot Football Club, at the Goolwa Oval.

Goolwa/Port Elliot Football Club members Jake Foristal, Jayden Headon and David Carnevale with Rotarians Alan Williams and president Di Keach.

Goolwa/Port Elliot Football Club members Jake Foristal, Jayden Headon and David Carnevale with Rotarians Alan Williams and president Di Keach.

And the club is planning for another unit to be installed in the Goolwa Shopping Centre, as a service to the community. Both units are paid for by the Rotary Club of Goolwa, and supported by the Rotary Foundation.

 De-fibs are designed to shock a patient’s heart back into rhythm, after suffering a heart attack and are credited with increasing the chance of survival by 80 per cent over regular CPR if applied immediately after cardiac arrest with the chance of survival decreasing by 10 per cent for every minute treatment is delayed.

Like all modern units, this one is portable, and completely automatic, with voice instructions guiding through the procedure after placing the pads on a patient’s chest.

Football club president Ryan Bridges thanked Rotary for the presentation and said that although the unit was installed in the football change rooms, all seven organisations using the premises had been issued with the keys to the change rooms making the unit available  whenever there was a function at the oval.

Matt Meaney from JUMP Defibrillators is an Emergency Paramedic at Victor Harbor and has been with SA Ambulance since 1997. He’s had direct involvement with countless victims of Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) and the families left behind. 

HEART STARTER: Ron Hann, Peter Ferraro, Alan Williams and Matt Meaney at the Goolwa Shopping Centre where a defib is panning to be installed.

HEART STARTER: Ron Hann, Peter Ferraro, Alan Williams and Matt Meaney at the Goolwa Shopping Centre where a defib is panning to be installed.

“Currently SCA accounts for approximately 30,000 deaths per annum, which is 20 per cent of our total national death toll, or one Australian every 18 minutes,” Matt said. 

“Shockingly SCA takes as many victims as all major cancers, suicides and road deaths combined, but this  does not have to be. With early defibrillation and bystander CPR the majority of these Australians can be saved. 

“The great news is that life after heart surgery is incredibly good. Whether it’s a bypass, stent or implanted device (ICD) life generally goes back to normal or even better than it was before. But we need to defibrillate and restart your heart so you make it to the hospital!  Many SCA have absolutely no warning signs.”

SCA occurs when the heart and breathing stop unexpectantly, usually as a result of a blocked vessel in the heart or an abnormal heart rhythm. The result means the heart no longer pumps effectively and needs to be restarted or defibrillated. 

Only a defibrillator can restart a heart, CPR on it’s own cannot. Matt said many are getting their own personal defibrillators.  

SCA is often associated with elderly or unhealthy people. This is a myth, as it occurs to people of all ages and backgrounds, even the young and incredibly fit. 

“Sadly we currently only save approximately seven out of every 100 SCA victims. In other parts of the world they save up to 65 out of every 100 members of the community. Why? Because they have defibrillators (often know as automated external defibrillators or AEDs) readily available and people willing to use them,” he said. 

Unlike Europe, the USA and many other parts of the world, Australia does not have anywhere near enough available defibrillators.  Unlike these other countries defibrillators are currently not mandatory under Australian Law. 

In a SCA, you only have less than 10 minutes to restart a heart before irreversible death.  And with every minute that defibrillation is delayed a loved one’s chance of survival decreases by 10-15 per cent. Experts predict that one day most Australian households will have a defibrillator, much like smoke alarms. 

“Our region has a growing population that dramatically swells during holiday times and urgently needs defibrillators in as many South Coast areas as possible.

“Defibrillators are for everyone to use! Not just medical professionals. They are simple, safe and incredibly effective. You cannot do any harm, as they will only shock a person if it’s needed. Designed so that eight-year-old children can use them you simply need to turn them on and they will talk you through the whole process, step by step.” 

As authorised distributors for the major brands, Matt & The Team at JUMP Defibrillators will find the right solution for you. Give them a call on 1300 219 209 or check out www.jumpdefibs.com.au today so that when the time comes, you are calm, confident and prepared to JUMP IN and save a life.

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