Hooded Plover nest near Causeway

Keeping watch: Gayl Males and Richard Edwards of the South Coast Environment Centre are trying to raise public awareness of the endangered Hooded Plover.
Keeping watch: Gayl Males and Richard Edwards of the South Coast Environment Centre are trying to raise public awareness of the endangered Hooded Plover.

A pair of Hooded Plovers have taken up residence right next to the causeway, far from an ideal nesting location for a threatened species.

As a result of this it has become particularly important for the public to be observant of their pets while on the beach.

Gayl Males of the South Coast Environment Centre said the Hooded Plovers are very different from other plovers which tend to swoop as these plovers have no aggressive means of defense as they are quite small.

“They do nest on the beach in summer, so they like share the best parts of the beach with us but this is quite unusual because it’s such a busy area.”

Volunteer Richard Edwards said that the pair near the causeway are a local pair from Hindmarsh River.

The area which the birds have nested in has been completed, roped off and signs have been erected in locations where dogs must be kept on leashes.

Hooded Plovers numbers have dwindled to below 50 on the Fleurieu Peninsula.