Schools are invited to take part in a soil-probe program to learn about their conditions

WATER WISE: Schools are invited to take part in a soil-probe program. Picture: Supplied

WATER WISE: Schools are invited to take part in a soil-probe program. Picture: Supplied

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Creating a sustainable agricultural future, and teaching the next generation about the power of technology to better utilise resources, motivated George Dridan to set up an environmental education program that will see soil probes installed free-of-charge at local schools.

Utilising the technology from his Integrated Precision Viticulture business, including real-time probes that read soil moisture, nutrients and temperature every half-an-hour, schools will be able to participate in a long-term assessment of their unique conditions.

“A lot of schools are putting together education programs based on environmental factors, and technology goes hand-in-hand with that,” Mr Dridan said.

“This will allow them to see in real-time how the conditions are changing and what that means in terms of best using their water resources,” he said.

“People don’t often value water, and how important it is, so teaching children its value is an important lesson for the future.

“Today’s kids are going to go on to be the next generation of farmers, growers and even people who want to keep their garden green, and understanding how to use water is vital.”

"People don’t often value water, and how important it is, so teaching children its value is an important lesson for the future."

George Dridan

Mr Dridan will cover the cost and installation of the probes, either within the school’s premises or at a nearby property nominated by the school, and will organise access to the technology through school iPads.

“We can organise individual login details so each child can see what’s happening, and can then hopefully go home and share that with their parents,” he said.

“Having an awareness of what the technology can do, and how this can change how and when you water, can make a huge difference.”

The program has no end date, so schools will be able to monitor their conditions over an extended period of time, providing a unique glimpse of the region’s changing conditions.

“Schools can also see what’s happening in all other participating locations and compare their data to really see what’s going on,” he said.

While Mr Dridan welcomes the opportunity to share his knowledge, he’s also looking forward to hearing the children’s observations.

“The ideas they come up with are fascinating and I’m looking forward to hearing their views once they get started looking at the data,” he said. 

For further details on how to participate in the program please contact George Dridan on 0404 885 674 or george.d@ipvit.com.au.