National Close The Gap Day at Victor Harbor R-7 School

UNITE: Abby Bricknell and Archie Kartinyeri at the Nunga Garden, with Jackson, Angel, Harmony and Austin.
UNITE: Abby Bricknell and Archie Kartinyeri at the Nunga Garden, with Jackson, Angel, Harmony and Austin.

Something special happened at Victor Harbor R-7 School on Friday, March 15, with the opening of the Nunga Garden, as part of the National Close The Gap campaign. Close The Gap raises the focus on the health gap between non-Indigenous and Indigenous Australians and how Indigenous people die approximately 10 years earlier than non-Indigenous.

Victor Harbor R-7 Aboriginal Community Education Officer Abby Bricknell said it was important to get the community involved and students to be aware of the health differences. "We must get more resources for greater health services for Indigenous people," Ms Bricknell said. "The Nunga Garden signifies the unification which occurs at Victor Harbor R-7 between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous students. All our Nunga students planted native plants in the garden, so it will be a special place at the school grounds."

The whole school of approximately 600 students took part in the opening and then gathered on the school oval to make an Indigenous flag with the colours they were wearing. Indigenous Elder Archie Kartinyeri conducted the 'Welcome to Country'.

"I like what the Victor Harbor R-7 School is achieving in taking part in Close the Gap and raising awareness on health issues in our Indigenous community," Mr Kartinyeri said.

Students at Victor Harbor R-7 gather on the school oval to form the Indigenous flag, so a photo could be taken by a drone.

Students at Victor Harbor R-7 gather on the school oval to form the Indigenous flag, so a photo could be taken by a drone.

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