SA bird-life listed as critically endangered

On the brink of extinction: Two Orange-bellied Parrots sitting idly. Photo supplied by Birdlife Australia.
On the brink of extinction: Two Orange-bellied Parrots sitting idly. Photo supplied by Birdlife Australia.

On Thursday, April 11, BirdLife Australia and around 70 nature lovers of Adelaide gathered at BirdLife's Act For Birds, demanding all parties contesting May's federal election take urgent action to protect Australia's unique native bird-life.

The forum was sparked after the pitiful budget spend on environment and conservation, alongside a grim senate report on Australia's extinction crisis.

Investment in protection and restoration for the environment has been cut by almost 40 percent over the past six years.

BirdLife's Australia's Sean Dooley said stronger environmental laws were needed, and all parties needed to show stronger ambition to protect and recover our native birds for future generations.

"In the last eight years, fifteen more bird species have been classified as Threatened, and seven more have been listed as Critically Endangered. Our leaders must do better," said Mr Dooley.

President of Birds SA John Gitsham said there are a number of struggling bird species across the Fleurieu region.

In particular danger is the Hooded Plover; often seen on Victor Harbor beaches, the Fairy Tern; found in Goolwa, the Southern Emu-wren; between Cox Scrub Conservation Park and Deep Creek Conservation Park, and the White-Bellied Sea-Eagle; commonly spotted at Newland Head.

On the brink of extinction is the Orange-Bellied Parrot, which used to be found along the Goolwa Coastline and Coorong area. The species is largely under threat due to habitat loss and modification.

In recent years these critically endangered birds have completely disappeared from the area and there are now less than 50 left in Australia.

Mr Gitsham said that a review of laws would not only help protect Australia's bird-life, but other endangered species as well.

"Government after government have dismissed the need for stronger nature laws that can actually be enforced. Here in South Australia, we've had enough."

"We want action, now."