Officials remind South Australians to keep safe in the upcoming snake season

Red-bellied black snake at Deep Creek Conservation Park. Photo: Barry Duykers.
Red-bellied black snake at Deep Creek Conservation Park. Photo: Barry Duykers.

As the weather starts to heat up, the sunny spring days are set to spark snake breeding season.

During the warmer months, snakes start to come out of their hibernation-like state to look for food sources and breeding partners.

Department for Environment and Water spokesperson Deb Kelly said there were snakes all over South Australia, and warned the public to be snake aware in both regional and urban areas.

"Eastern brown snakes are found everywhere, but each region has its local speciality - and most are venomous," Dr Kelly said.

The Fleurieu Peninsula is home to a number of other dangerous snakes, including the red-bellied black snake, tiger snake, and pygmy copperhead.

"Just because you've never seen a snake on your property doesn't mean they aren't there, so you should always be careful about putting your hands or feet into spots you can't see, like long grass or that pile of junk behind the shed," Dr Kelly said.

People can avoid snakes on their property by keeping their yard clear of long grass and removing rubbish.

Snake catcher Luke Dunn with a brown snake. Picture: Supplied

Snake catcher Luke Dunn with a brown snake. Picture: Supplied

Dr Kelly said snakes were generally shy and would not attack unless provoked, so if one is spotted it is best to leave them be.

Snakes are protected native animals and have an important part to play in the ecosystem, particularly in helping to control rats and mice.

Anyone who sees a snake should not try to catch or kill it as this is when most bites happen.

In the case that a person is bitten, call 000 and tightly wrap a pressure bandage over the area until medical help arrives.

For more information how to keep safe during snake season, visit www.environment.sa.gov.au.

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