Local rider takes out national kiteboarding honours

Making his mark: Local kitesurfer Martyn Bone competing at the 2021 Kiteboarding Australia Wave Nationals in Torquay. Photo: Maurice Windley.
Making his mark: Local kitesurfer Martyn Bone competing at the 2021 Kiteboarding Australia Wave Nationals in Torquay. Photo: Maurice Windley.

Hayborough kitesurfer Martyn Bone has ridden his way to the top, winning the 2021 Kiteboarding Australia Wave Nationals in the Masters Division.

This follows a strong run of form for Martyn, who placed third at the competition last year and has been recognised as South Australia's top kitesurfer for a number of years.

The event was held in Torquay, Victoria over the first weekend of February, and Martyn was up against 16 other riders across three first round heats, two quarter finals, two semis and a final.

"There was a good turnout with competitors from all around the country and this is the competition everyone aims for," Martyn said.

"After going over last year for the first time and finishing third, I really wanted to go one better this time around."

Winner: Martyn Bone and his 2021 Wave Nationals Masters Division trophy.

Winner: Martyn Bone and his 2021 Wave Nationals Masters Division trophy.

Martyn had limited preparation leading into the competition, having spent little time on his kiteboard over summer, as local conditions are more favourable to the sport during the winter months which produce stronger winds.

"With wave events, it's hard to go into things confident because you never know what the waves are going to be like in your heat and what the conditions are going to be like as they can change so quickly," Martyn said.

"You just have to take each heat as it comes. You have to be adaptable but I like it when it's windy and wavy. The bigger the waves and the more wind, the better."

Competing in four man heats, the Masters Division was run across a single day, testing the endurance and skill of all 16 riders.

"It was a long day with a lot of heats. The competition ran for seven or eight hours and you had to deal with long breaks in between heats," Martyn said.

"I had a shocker in my semi final when I caught a nasty wave that closed out on me and held me down for a long period.

"I managed to claw things back and win it with a couple of good waves, so going into the final I knew things would be difficult. I had confidence, but I was up against three locals who know the conditions well.

"Thankfully, everything fell into place and I got some great waves throughout the heat and was able to link heaps of turns which is what the judges want to see."

Following the final heat, the riders had to wait for about two hours to find out the results.

Third and second place were announced first, leaving Martyn to wonder if he'd finished first or fourth.

"When my name got called out it was a bit surreal and I'm still getting over the win now," he said.

"I'm looking forward to getting into the water locally over winter and defending my title next year."

The Wave Nationals are run over four days annually and Martyn said he had a great time watching some of the younger competitors and top, internationally recognised riders.