Port Elliot Surf Life Saving Club starts patrols in readiness for the summer season

PREPARED: PESLSC members on Halcyon Patrol at Horseshoe Bay. Patrols are operating from Commodore Reserve until the new clubrooms are ready.
PREPARED: PESLSC members on Halcyon Patrol at Horseshoe Bay. Patrols are operating from Commodore Reserve until the new clubrooms are ready.

The new lifesaving season has begun for the Port Elliot Surf Life Saving Club (PESLSC).

At Port Elliot beaches will be patrolled every weekend, public holidays and the week between Christmas and New Year as the summer season approaches.

Patrols will end in April.

The clubrooms will be opened in stages, with priority being given to getting lifesaving operations up and running, and having members familiarising themselves with the building and its technologies.

After that upstairs will open and people can have a drink at the new bar with its magnificent views.

The club is looking for people to come and get involved in the new complex.

There are many off-beach jobs such as bar and kiosk staff. The official opening is November 20.

Our patrolling numbers have been boosted by the addition of 11 new Bronze medallion holders and 10 SRC Juniors, all of whom completed an intensive week long course to achieve those qualifications.

This has been an intensive week for the participants and the hard working volunteers trainers.

Nippers kicks off with a come and try day on November 6, before the official start on November 13.

Full information and a downloadable booklet are on PESLSC's website: https://portelliotslsc.com.au/

PESLSC spokesperson and long time member Marty Smee said as far as beach safety was concerned, Horseshoe Bay was a magnificent and safe place to swim.

"Most of the issues occur with people getting dumped in waves at the Commodore Point end of the beach. We have had some serious incidents there over the years," Marty said.

"The advice from SLSSA is simple - Stop. Look. Plan. Don't go into surf conditions which might be beyond your skill level.

If in doubt speak to a lifesaver and we know the conditions of the Bay better than most people, remembering of course that the red and yellow flags mark out the area in which we would prefer for you to swim.

"Additions to our patrols are a new purpose fitted all terrain vehicle, and stand up paddle boards for increased water surveillance.

"Having attended a first aid course along with many other of our patrolling members, the one major piece of advice was for as many people as possible to learn CPR.

"It is very simple and if administered quickly, can save lives."

One major piece of advice was for as many people as possible to learn CPR

Marty Smee

Marty said if someone collapsed, don't stand around waiting for someone else to act - "get in there and start CPR as soon as possible and call an ambulance".

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